My Favorite TV Episode of All Time

You know that we do take-away.
We deliver too.
Open twenty-four hours, babe.
Just waiting on a call from you.

The Sopranos
Episode 26 – Funhouse (Season 2 Final)

Directed by
John Patterson

Written by
David Chase & Todd A. Kessler

Regular Cast
James Gandolfini … Tony Soprano
Lorraine Bracco … Dr. Jennifer Melfi
Edie Falco … Carmela soprano
Michael Imperioli … Christopher Moltisanti
Dominic Chianese … Corrado ‘Junior’ Soprano
Vincent Pastore … Salvatore ‘Big Pussy’ Bonpensiero
Steven Van Zandt … Silvio Dante
Tony Sirico … Paulie ‘Walnuts’ Gualtieri
Robert Iler … Anthony ‘A.J.’ Soprano
Jamie-Lynn Sigler … Meadow Soprano
Nancy Marchand … Livia Soprano

Guest Players
Jerry Adler … Herman ‘Hesh’ Rapkin
Federico Castelluccio … Furio Guinta
John Ventimiglia … Artie Bucco
Dan Grimaldi … Patsy Parisi
Frank Pellegrino … Frank Cubitoso
Robert Patrick … David Scatino
Louis Lombardi, Jr. … Skip Lipari
Matt Servitto … Agent Harris
Sofia Milos … Anna Lisa
Maureen Van Zandt … Gabriella Dante
Toni Kalem … Angie Bonpensiero
David Margulies … Neil Mink
Nicole Burdette … Barbara Giglione
Tom Aldredge … Hugh DeAngelis
Suzanne Shepherd … Mary DeAngelis
John Fiore … Gigi Cestone
Robert Lupone … Bruce Cusamano
Barbara Andres … Quintina
Sig Libowitz … Hillel
David Anzuelo … Flight Attendant
Kathleen Fasolino … Meadow’s friend
Ray Garvey … Airport Guard
David Healy … Vice Principal
Ajay Mehta … Sundeep Kumar
Jay Palit … Indian Man

Wrap Up
Tony is feeling pretty good, despite his mother busting his chops after Janice left. He solves it by giving her airline tickets of the Scatino bust-out, so she can go and visit an old aunt (aunt Quinn, the other miserabile). He’s earning good enough money with a prepaid phone card scheme to buy Carmela a mink coat and he’s not so depressed anymore. Another reason for Tony’s untroubled state-of-mind is the demise of Richie, ‘All my enemies are smoked’, Tony tells his crew optimistically during a diner. But it is too good to be true, his unconsciousness tries to tell him. He gets food poisoning the day after. And in a fever dream Silvio tells him, ‘our true enemy has yet to reveal himself’, in true Al Pacino style. Silvio is even wearing the maroon vest Pacino wore in The Godfather III.

Pussy’s not feeling so well. He has to give his phone card earnings straight to FBI Agent Skip Lipari. He didn’t get food poisoning though, even though he ate at the same restaurants; an Indian place and Artie Bucco’s. Tony suspects Artie’s shellfish, but when Artie calls Pussy they find out he doesn’t have any symptoms, while they had different courses at the Indian place. Tony starts dreaming again, about him at the boardwalks. First he dreams that he sets himself on fire in front of his friends because he’s diagnosed with terminal cancer (‘what if they’re wrong?’). Then he dreams that he shoots Paulie Walnuts during a card game. He discusses the meaning with Dr. Melfi in a dream therapy session, while he also talks about Pussy. ‘Pussy’ in multiple ways.

Tony knows something is not feeling right about Big Pussy. He also knows someone has to get whacked, because of the Paulie dream. In another dream sequence, a fish who looks and talks like Big Pussy tells Tony he has been working with the federal government. Tony still doesn’t want to believe it, but when he wakes up he knows what has to be done. A little later, Tony and Silvio come by Big Pussy’s house to pick him up to help them buy a boat. Tony, still sick, pretends to get another attack and goes into the upstairs bathroom. While Silvio keeps Big Pussy downstairs with Angie, drinking coffee, Tony searches the bedroom. He finds what he was looking for; wiring equipment and tapes. When Tony comes downstairs he says, ‘who’s ready to buy a boat?’

Paulie Walnuts is waiting by the boat and Pussy is getting nervous. The boat departs and when open water is reached, Pussy is taken below deck, where Tony confronts him with his betrayal. After denying it, Big Pussy has no choice but to confess. He knows his number is up. And after a last round of tequila with his friends, the inevitable happens, Tony, Paulie and Silvio shoot Pussy and he drops dead in the cabin. His body is placed in a bag with weights and entrusted to the Atlantic Ocean.

When Tony comes home, his mother calls to tell him that she is being held by airport security for the Scatino tickets. Not much later the FBI comes by with a warrant. Just when Tony is handcuffed, Meadow comes in with her friends, one day before her graduation. Luckily Tony gets off easy but he is still concerned. The season ends the way it started, with a montage of all the Soprano crew’s businesses, such as Barone Sanitation, the Jewish owned hotel, the phone card scam and David Scatino who’s divorced, broke and leaving town. The scene is scored by The Rolling Stones with ‘Thru and Thru’, an insanely great choice.

At Meadows graduation party the whole Soprano cast is present and it’s one big happy family again. Tony stands alone in the living room, smoking a cigar and reflecting on recent times. The final shot is from the ocean, where Pussy sleeps forever.

Why Great?
This final episode of the second season is extremely well written and directed. It is a powerful and surprising final episode that reminds of a Greek tragedy. Tony has to make his hardest decision yet. This is totally necessary in his leadership position, but he was also the one who loved Big Pussy most whose death is therefore a great loss for him. And for the viewer as well. Pussy’s passing and the dream sequences leading up to it are so far the most exciting and memorable moments of the Soprano saga.

When I first watched ‘Funhouse’, I just couldn’t believe it. I was hoping for a terrific episode to wrap up the season, like season 1 did with ‘I Dream of Jeannie Cusamano’. A conventional finale that neatly ties up the remaining storylines, although The Sopranos was never conventional. ‘Funhouse’ did something else entirely. By adding twenty minutes of dreamtime I got much closer to Twin Peaks than to the mob films it originally seemed to be based on. It does resolve the main remaining story – that Big Pussy is indeed ‘singing’ for the feds – but it does so in a brilliantly surprising way. By delving into the main character’s subconscious and making him realise the ugly truth his conscious self couldn’t accept.

Michael Imperioli (who plays Christopher) has a theory*1 about the episode. That Tony didn’t have food poisoning at all, but that it was the knowledge that he had to kill his friend that made him so sick. And killing his friend he does. The scene on the boat, of which the interior scenes were shot in a studio, is a dramatic highlight of the show. Brilliant acting by the cast, especially James Gandolfini and Vincent Pastore as Pussy. It’s ridiculous that season 2 didn’t win the major Emmy Awards that year, but they weren’t ready for The Sopranos yet. The show has been groundbreaking from the beginning, and this episode really took it to another level again.

Finest Moment: Pussy on the Brain
Tony is having fever dreams while suffering from bad food poisoning. All dreams have certain elements in common; danger, cancer (destruction from inside out) and Pussy. It all leads up to this final dream; the dream in which Pussy – in fish shape, but it really looks like Pussy! – reveals to Tony that he is working for the government. It is in moments like this that The Sopranos is at its most powerful; using a dream as a method to really push the plot forward. In the first season, when his mother wanted him whacked, Tony was in denial and started fantasising about a Madonna. But he didn’t acknowledge the truth until he heard his mother speak on the FBI tapes. Now, Tony has learned to listen to his subconscious. He has been having a strange feeling about Pussy for a long time and now he is open to the ultimate truth. When he wakes up he knows. The fish is also a brilliant find. In a macho gang like the Sopranos, it is considered unmanly to betray your friends. Therefore, it is Pussy – the guy with the feminine name – who’s a rat. There is also a pussy joke in there, pussy smells like… you get the picture. The reference is also to death, as in ‘sleeps with the fishes’, and it foreshadows Pussy’s ultimate resting place, the ocean. This dream is the perfect crossover between the series’ essentials; the mob and psychiatry.

*1 Talking Sopranos Podcast, episode 26 – Funhouse.

How to Write a Television Series

Originally published on FilmDungeon.com on 24-12-2007

As a lifelong devotee of the moving image, I developed the idea of writing screenplays. What better way is there to get your break into movies when you’re a non-professional that wants to be a filmmaker? I had already written a movie screenplay. A low-budget horror-comedy comparable with Peter Jackson’s Bad Taste. The problem with actually filming it was that a considerable budget was required. I am from the Netherlands where even renowned filmmakers struggle to get another project done. So who was going to invest in a cult film with a microscopic target group and an inexperienced director?

It was time for a strategy change. TV-series are the next best thing. And being the creator of a TV-series is what many would call a dream job. So would I. You get to write and produce a mini-movie every week, and when successful, you can continue it for as long as a decade. So I decided to start the creation of my very own TV-series. I already knew my subject. Or concept if you will. Now I needed some ideas on how to craft my screenplay.

To get this done I bought a book: The Sopranos – Selected Scripts From Three Seasons. This is an extremely useful book for aspiring TV-writers. But knowing the show is probably a prerequisite. It describes the process of writing a series. The creator of the show, David Chase, explains how he came up with the overall theme of every season. Then, together with his writing team, he started working on the individual episodes. Every episode has three or four storylines. One major storyline called A. Then there are smaller ones called B, C and sometimes D.

Once the storylines were decided, the actual scenes were described. The five example screenplays in the book are in between 35 and 80 scenes long, and approximately 60 pages (1 hour of TV). When the scenes for every story were decided they are sequenced in a logical order. Then the episodes were divided among the writers. They had approximately two weeks to come up with the first draft. Then the show’s creator read it and gave the writer feedback on what he liked and didn’t like about it. Then the second draft was written and this process continued till the final draft was ready for production.

A great benefit of this book is that it contains five example TV-plays. If you need direction on the format of a TV-screenplay, all you have to do is check out one of these. After finishing the book I was ready to start the creation process of my very own TV-series. First a lot of research had to be done. I collected newspaper articles and started reading books on my subject. I started shaping my fictional world by describing the characters, their life stories and their personality traits.

The research and preparation took me a whole year. Of course I did it all in my spare time. I also had a day job to keep going. After this year I was ready to write an actual episode; the pilot. I wanted to do this in one go, because I thought it would make the writing process easier. So during a holiday in Crete I wrote the pilot script. It was certainly fun to do. But finishing the script was a weird sensation. I was proud that I had not given up, and had now completed it. But I was also wondering if what I wrote was actually any good…

Update 2021
No, that pilot tv-script I wrote is not very good. However, I haven’t lost my passion for this writing business. I recently decided to give it another go. That Bad Taste like script I mentioned earlier, I have decided to rewrite it. And it will be in English, so it is fit for international audiences.

Will it ever be a movie? Small chance. No one will want to produce it, that’s for sure. It’s too weird and has no commercial appeal I think. But if I ever get my hands on some money that has no immediate purpose, I might produce it myself. It has the potential to become a fantastic amateur cult movie.

And I would put it straight on YouTube when it would be done. It would be a lot of fun to make for the voluntary or underpaid cast and crew, that’s for sure. So I take another advice from David Chase, don’t stop believing!

Closing chapter: Terugblik op dramatisch 2020

Zeg me dat het niet zo is.
Zeg me dat het niet zo is.
Zeg me dat het niet waar is…

In de kerstvakantie neem ik altijd twee weken vrij om op te laden. Ik herbekijk dan altijd een van mijn favoriete filmseries, zoals The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit of de originele Star Wars trilogie. Dit jaar ben ik bezig met een herkijk van The Sopranos, mijn favoriete serie ooit. Ik heb hem bijna tien jaar niet gezien en het is zelfs nog beter dan ik me herinner. Het is zo goed geschreven en gespeeld. Waanzinnig goed. Ik ben bezig met een e-book over de show. Dat verschijnt waarschijnlijk volgend jaar; er liggen al veel teksten klaar. Ik geniet ook van het nieuwe album van Paul McCartney, ‘McCartney III’. En over Paul gesproken: In 2021 komt Peter Jackson, een van mijn lievelingsfilmmakers en hardcore Beatles-fan, met de documentaire Get Back. Ik heb vijf minuten materiaal gezien op Disney Plus en het ziet er waanzinnig uit. Intiemere beelden van The Beatles heb ik zelden gezien. En dus, als er één film is waar ik naar uitkijk volgend jaar is deze het wel. En als ik er nog eentje mag noemen is dat The Many Saints of Newark, een prequel van The Sopranos, gerealiseerd door Sopranos-bedenker en schrijver David Chase. Met in een van de hoofdrollen Michael Gandolfini, zoon van de legendarische James Gandolfini die overleed in 2013, maar onsterfelijk werd door zijn vertolking van Tony Soprano. Nu stapt zijn zoon in zijn voetsporen. 2021 wordt een heel goed filmjaar.

Qua films was 2020, net als in vele andere opzichten, juist een waardeloos jaar. Ik heb een filmpje in mijn hoofd, waarin het liedje ‘It was a very good year’ van Frank Sinatra speelt en we beelden zien van verlaten straten, mondkapjes, begrafenissen, dramatische toestanden op de IC’s en sombere toespraken van politici. Ik heb zelf niet te klagen overigens. Toen in maart de eerste lockdown werd aangekondigd vond ik het stiekem wel spannend. Een ongekende gebeurtenis. Een hele lichte versie van een zombie apocalypse, zoals in Dawn of the Dead. Het had wel wat: verplicht thuis met toch alle luxes van het moderne leven: speciaalbier, wijn, een koelkast vol met eten, een enorme collectie films en boeken en via het internet verbonden met de hele wereld. Maar ik begrijp natuurlijk dat corona heel veel mensen in de ellende heeft gestort met verliesgebeurtenissen, financiële problemen en gevoelens van eenzaamheid.

Van mijn persoonlijke vrienden is de eigenaar van het bedrijf waar ik sinds 2008 voor werk getroffen. Hij kon niet verdragen dat zijn levenswerk ten gronde ging en stapte op 1 juli uit het leven. Net voordat hij zijn aandelen zou overdragen aan een overnemende partij. Voor de rest van ons (werknemers) was de overname een redding, een veilige haven. Maar voor Alex voelde dit helemaal anders. Wat er precies in zijn hoofd heeft afgespeeld zullen we nooit weten, maar de aanhoudende paniek veroorzaakt door corona heeft vrijwel zeker een doorslaggevende rol gespeelt in zijn dramatische actie. Onze directeur Melle wist het rampjaar onlangs goed onder woorden te brengen. “Stel dat iemand in december vorig jaar gezegd had; ‘er komt in 2020 een dodelijk virus waardoor er niemand meer naar onze events en trainingen komt en dan maakt Alex er een einde aan’, dan hadden we gezegd: wat een slecht filmscenario.” De werkelijkheid is soms uiterst vreemd en onvoorspelbaar. Als een Zwarte Zwaan.


Voorwoord Quote, editie oktober, 2020

Maar los van deze misère waar ik nog dagelijks aan denk, ben ik er tot nu toe goed doorheen gekomen. Ik kijk documentaires over wat de mensen uit Syrië is overkomen en kan deze lockdown makkelijk relativeren. Ik zit in een fijne bubbel. Wat betreft 2021 ben ik voorzichtig positief. Het kan nog wel een tijdje gaan duren, maar ik hoop dat we in de zomer het sociale verkeer weer redelijk op de rit hebben. Mijn professionele leven ziet er ondanks corona goed uit: een groter bedrijf, meer mogelijkheden, nieuwe collega’s. En ik heb een fantastisch team met Charles, Willem, Jan, Yilmaz, Henk en Tomer. De mensen waar ik problemen mee had zijn allemaal weg. 2021 wordt op werkgebied ongetwijfeld een heel goed jaar. Persoonlijk gaat het ook goed. Rosa ontwikkelt zich als een heel sociaal en vrolijk meisje. En Loesje blijft worstelen met chronisch pijnsyndroom en (andere) psychologische issues, maar ervaart veel succes op werkgebied als begeleidster van jongeren en om een of andere reden vindt ze het ook met mij ook nog steeds leuk en dat is geheel wederzijds.

De reden dat ik dramatisch boven deze blog heb geschreven is dus eigenlijk puur de dood van Alex en omdat ik meeleef met alle mensen die getroffen zijn door corona. Maar zelf vind ik het leven mooi en interessant en een overwegend positieve exercitie. We zijn zelfs nog getrakteerd op een nederlaag van Trump en een implosie van Forum voor Democratie. De silver linings zijn dus niet moeilijk te vinden voor mij. Een laatste positief gebeurtenis om het jaar mee af te sluiten is het verschijnen van ‘The Grand Biocentric Design’, het derde deel in de serie over biocentrisme van Robert Lanza, het boek dat mijn leven in 2017 heeft veranderd. Hierin wordt nog meer bewijsmateriaal gepresenteerd dat aantoont dat leven en de kosmos één zijn en dat de dood niet echt kan bestaan in een dergelijk bewustzijns-systeem.

Deze blog heet fragmenten omdat alle aspecten van mijn leven erin voorbij komen: films, mijn filosofie, boeken die ik gelezen heb, mijn persoonlijke leven… Samen vormen die wat ik beschouw als ‘ik’. Maar uiteindelijk bestaat er geen ik en maakt deze illusionaire verschijning onderdeel uit van een veel grotere entiteit. En ik ben er helemaal oké mee om een oneindig klein element te zijn van iets veel groters. Ik zou zelfs niks anders willen. Een gevolg is dat je er nooit uit kan stappen. En dus is de actie van Alex niets meer geweest dan een reset. Een hoofdstuk in het boek heet ‘Quantum Suicide and the Impossibility of Being Dead’. Let wel, dit is een boek over natuurkunde en geen filosofie.

Voor de familie van de overledene blijft zo’n gebeurtenis overigens wel heel naar, want vanuit hun perspectief is die persoon permanent vertrokken. Vanuit het perspectief van de overledene kan er echter geen sprake zijn van ‘weg zijn’. Het gaat allemaal door en door en door en door. Ook corona is maar een heel klein streepje op een oneindig lang toneelstuk. Laat die volgende lock down dus maar komen. ‘Ik’ houd het nog wel even uit.