My 10 Favorite Horror Movies Ever

Checked and double checked. Darlings killed! This is it:

10. Bad Taste (1987)

Peter Jackson’s inventive low budget debut film is a delight in gory horror and awesome humor. It’s about aliens coming to New Zealand to set-up a supply chain in human flesh for their intergalactic fast food restaurants. What they didn’t count on was secret agent Derek (played by Jackson himself) and his team! Great to see that the visionary director behind The Lord of the Rings trilogy started his career with this hilarious B-movie.

Greatest Moment: The vomit scene: ‘ahhhh, l think the gruel is ready!!’

09. The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Back at the old days, they made great films too, you know. And the Universal Monster Movies are not to be ignored when you’re rating your all-time favorite horrors. The beautiful gothic scenery, spot-on art direction, excellent make-up effects, the universal themes, the humor (the monster smoking a cigar!)… The Bride of Frankenstein is the best in its genre and at least as impressive in the time it was made as its contemporary counterparts. Ehhh, which contemporary counterparts by the way?

Greatest moment: The monster and the hermit.

08. Army of Darkness (1992)

You want some more Evil Dead? Come get some! Ash is back with a chainsaw attached to his wrist and a boomstick on his back. This time around he’s kicking Evil’s ass in medieval times. Isn’t it groovy? Well, yes it is. Besides Raimi’s action-packed script and trademark camera tricks, fans can enjoy a brilliant turn from B-Movie star Bruce Campbell. With his masterful comic timing, loads of one-liners and his lady man skills, he makes Ash a truly lovable hero. Not to mention a horror icon. Hail to the King baby!

Greatest moment: The pit.

07. Scream (1996)

This postmodern take on the slasher genre is both an incredible homage and superb addition to the genre. The screenplay by Kevin Williamson is masterfully written and director Wes Craven finds exactly the right balance between suspense, teenage stupidity, humor and extreme violence. Followed by three decent sequels (and a tv-show), but this first one is the best by far.

Greatest Moment: The revelation who the killer is.

06. Predator (1987)

The first Predator is an unique movie that holds a very special place in my heart. The concept is fairly simple (mysterious alien hunts and kills soldiers and mercenaries in South American jungle), the execution is flawless. It features the greatest team of warriors ever assembled that faces off against the greatest alien ever created for cinema. It’s just awesome in every way.

Greatest moment: There are many great scenes featuring the predator, but Schwarzenegger’s team butchering an entire guerrilla army is so bad-ass that I have to pick that one.

5. Dead Ringers (1988)

Two bodies. Two minds. One Soul. Separation can be a terrifying thing.
No monsters or killers are needed to make a creepy film. The human psyche can be terrifying enough by itself. Jeremy Irons gives an Oscar worthy double performance as a pair of twins who become mentally intertwined together. Brilliant psychological horror by master of bodily transformation, David Cronenberg.

Greatest Moment: The superbly creepy credit sequence and the unsettling ending.

04. Psycho (1960)

Psycho is such an inspirational film that it spawned an entire genre of slasher / serial killer movies. With its groundbreaking narrative techniques and tension building it’s hard to deny the importance of Hitchcock’s masterpiece in cinema history. Janet Leigh is a joy to watch and so is Anthony Perkins in his lunatic performance.

Greatest moment: The shower scene off course, which is completely shocking to this day.

03. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

The scariest horror movie of my childhood and frankly an almost traumatic experience. I recently saw it and even though the scare effect is weakened down somewhat, it is still a deeply chilling experience. Master of Horror Wes Craven takes all the terrible emotions the worst nightmares can cause and uses them to maximum effect.

Greatest moment: The protagonist Nancy has a number of terrifying dreams.

02. Evil Dead II (1987)

Groovy! Comedy and scares are effectively combined in this sequel to Raimi’s classic The Evil Dead*. Yes, it is a sequel, the beginning is just an altered summary of the first flick. Bruce Campbell makes Ash a true horror icon as he chops up his girlfriend and fight his own hand. Slapstick humor and rapid chainsaw action make this a true classic in the genre and Raimi’s best film. They don’t make ‘m like this anymore. Classic.

Greatest moment: In the cellar with sweet Henrietta. Complete madness.

01. Dawn of the Dead (1978)
This is it, my all-time favorite horror movie. What makes it so good? It is just a trip to become part of Romero’s apocalyptic zombie world for a couple of hours. When used properly as in Dawn of the Dead, zombies are really a marvelous invention. They can be sad, scary, or comical and at the same time serve as a metaphor for the consumerist society. The shopping mall as a zombie survivor stronghold works incredibly well. The movie features well written characters, appropriately disgusting special make-up effects by Tom Savini and great music. It is the most atmospheric horror film; very rich in ideas and horrific imagery. I love it.

Greatest moment: Going shopping off course!

*OMITTED:

The Evil Dead (1981)

In 1980 three friends went out to shoot a cheap horror movie that was destined to become a genre classic. The handsome one, Bruce Campbell, became the actor of the group. ‘He was the one that girls wanted to look at.’ Sam Raimi later became a top director in Hollywood (directing Spiderman). And finally, Rob Tapert became a successful producer. The Evil Dead is still a very effective horror flick to this day with many unforgettable moments, such as the tree rape scene and blood-soaked finale.

Greatest Moment: The gory climax in the cabin.

Advertenties

Lessen in scenarioschrijven #3 – Gebruik van symboliek

Lees ook:
Lessen in scenarioschrijven #1 – De basis
Lessen in scenarioschrijven #2 – Inspiratie

The Hero’s Journey begins here…

We vervolgen de serie over scenarioschrijven met symboliek. Esoterische symboliek welteverstaan, dat wil zeggen dat niet iedereen het ziet; je moet er een beetje verstand van hebben. Dat neemt niet weg dat symboliek in ons collectieve onderbewuste zit opgeborgen (Jung), dus wanneer we het aanschouwen doet het toch iets met ons al kunnen we niet direct omschrijven wat.

Symboliek is een omvangrijke studie, dus in één artikel kan ik er weinig over kwijt. Wat ik daarom wil doen is 10 voorbeelden geven van hoe symboliek gebruikt wordt in populaire films. Dat geeft je een idee over hoe je het kunt inzetten. Bronnen waar je vervolgens zelf op zoek kunt gaan naar geschikte symboliek voor je scenario zijn onder meer: het numerologische, kabbalistische, astrologische, magische, mythologische en het occulte. Daarnaast kun je kijken naar tarotkaarten, alchemie, iconografie en het mysticisme.

De 10 voorbeelden uit populaire films (met heel veel dank aan Robert W. Sullivan) zijn:

1. Zoektocht naar kennis
De Griekse oudheid biedt een schat aan symbolische betekenis. ‘Gnosis’ is het Griekse woord voor kennis. Het gnosticisme is een christelijke filosofie met mogelijk wortels in het oude Rome en Perzië. Sophia, wier naam in het Grieks ‘wijsheid’ betekent (Philo-Sophia = letterlijk: vriend van wijsheid), is een van de centrale figuren in het gnosticisme dat de nadruk legt op individuele kennis en wijsheid als weg naar de verlossing en vereniging met God. Incarnaties van het vrouwelijke archetype Sophia in literatuur en film zijn o.a. Alice in ‘Alice in Wonderland’ en Dorothy in ‘The Wizard of Oz’. Alice en Dorothy bereiken Gnosis door een occulte en mystieke ervaring door te maken. Ze worden beide naar een magische wereld getransporteerd middels een ‘ladder’ (Jacob’s Ladder, ladder van Minerva), namelijk een tornado (Dorothy) en een konijnenhol (Alice) respectievelijk. De ervaringen die ze vervolgens ondergaan hebben hun grondslag in Gnostische wijsheid, verlichting, het mystieke, het occulte en het dualistische.

2. Dualisme
Het dualisme is de leer dat het heelal beheerst wordt door twee tegenovergestelde principes, het ene goedaardig en het andere kwaadaardig. Dit is als thema volop aanwezig in o.a. science fiction in fantasy films, zoals ‘The Lord of the Rings’ en ‘Star Wars’. In laatstgenoemde neemt het duistere, mechanische keizerrijk het op tegen de lumineuze, organische rebellen.

In ‘The Lord of the Rings’, met name in deel twee ‘The Two Towers’, staat ook de strijd tussen industrie en natuur centraal. Saruman’s orcs vernietigen grote delen van het woud van Fangorn om een gigantische oorlogsindustrie op te bouwen in Isengard. Dit symboliseert de inval op de natuur door de Industriële Revolutie in de 19de eeuw. Het personage Treebeard, een lopende en pratende boom, verwoordt het als volgt; “There’s always smoke rising from Isengard these days. There was a time when Saruman would walk in my woods, but now he has a mind of metal, and wheels. He no longer cares for growing things.”

Een ander aspect van dualisme dat in ‘The Two Towers’ aan bod komt is dat tussen geest en materie. Centraal in de film staat het het verbond tussen de twee torens van Sauron en Saruman: Barad-dûr en Orthanc. Het oog van Sauron staat voor spirituele kwaadaardigheid terwijl Saruman het stoffelijke kwaad personifieert. Saruman vertegenwoordigt de fysieke tirannie die de natuur overspoeld en Sauron is een soort bovenzinnelijk kanker dat overleeft zolang de ene ring blijft bestaan in Midden-Aarde.

3. De zonneheld
Ian Fleming, schrijver van de James Bond boeken, werkte voor zijn carrière als schrijver in de Britse Naval Intelligence samen met de occultist Aleister Crowley. Deze vriendschap heeft grote invloed gehad op de James Bond boeken. Bond is de zonneheld (‘Solar Hero’) die het opneemt tegen een superschurk met een duister doel; vaak streven deze schurken een nieuwe wereldorde na met zichzelf aan het hoofd. Ook de Bond-films en boeken staan bol van het dualisme: licht en duisternis, goed en kwaad, verdorvenheid en onschuld…. Bond is het heroïsche archetype die het opneemt tegen het vileine archetype die vaak een toepasselijke naam draagt, zoals Dr. No (negatief geladen tegenover Bond’s positieve held)


De zonnehelden in films (James Bond, Neo, Luke Skywalker) krijgen tegenwicht van de maan die gepersonifieerd wordt door een vrouwelijke held. Princes Leia (Carrie Fisher) draagt in ‘Star Wars’ witte jurken om de nachtelijke glans van de maan te personificeren.

4. Eenheid met vrouwen
Waarom maakt James Bond zoveel vrouwen het hof? Ook hierin schuilt symboliek van dualistische aard (man-vrouw). Ik laat expert Robert W. Sullivan aan het woord: “If the godhead joins the male and female in the ultimate unity, than to be like God-man must unite the masculine and the feminine elements of his nature. In Jungian terms he must unite himself to his ANIMA, the feminine part of a man’s personality. In terms of sexual symbolism, he must penetrate and ‘know’ his own virgin feminine component to enter the temple where the godhead is concealed. In other words, Bond must unite with the sacred feminine or ‘the Bond Girl’ to achieve a form of Gnostic alchemical ascent allowing him to defeat the Demiurge-like villain.”

Simpel gezegd, Bond moet seks hebben met de Bond-girl om de bad guy te verslaan. De namen van de Bond-girls stralen altijd seksualiteit en energie uit: Pussy Galore (vagina in overvloed) en Domino Vitali (vitale dame). Deze heilige eenheid gaat altijd goed, op één keer na. In ‘On Your Majesty’s Secret Service’ trouwt Bond met Teresa ‘Tracy’ Draco, dochter van Marc-Ange Draco, leider van een machtig Corsicaans misdaadsyndicaat. Oftewel, Bond’s vrouw is zelf afkomstig van de donkere zijde (Draco betekent dan ook ‘Draak’ in Grieks/Latijn). De alchemie tussen licht en duisternis is niet mogelijk en direct na de bruiloft – nog voordat zij het huwelijk geconsumeerd hebben – wordt Tracy doodgeschoten door Bond’s aartsvijand Blofeld. De draak wordt gedood door een andere draak.


Het gedoemde huwelijk tussen Bond en Tracy Draco laat zien hoe het onderbewuste symboliek oppikt. De relatie tussen Bond en zijn nieuwe schoonfamilie voelde al vanaf het begin ongemakkelijk.

5. Locaties als symbool
Het Overlook Hotel in Stanley Kubrick’s horrorfilm ‘The Shining’ staat symbool voor de donkere kant van de Verenigde Staten. Het hotel is gebouwd op een oude Indiase begraafplaats, net als het land Amerika gebouwd is op Indianenland. Daarmee hebben de kolonisten letterlijk de natie van de Indianen begraven. Oude presidenten zijn te gast geweest in het geïsoleerde Overlook Hotel. En de kleuren rood, wit en blauw – emblemen van de Amerikaanse vlag en patriottisme – zijn volop aanwezig in de film.

6. Faustiaans pact
Een Faustiaans pact is een deal waarbij een ambitieuze persoon zijn morele integriteit inruilt voor macht en succes. In ‘Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith’ personifieert Anakin Skywalker Dr. Faust en kanselier Palpatine de duivel zelf. Anakin’s motivatie is mystieke Sith wijsheid te vergaren die hem zal helpen zijn vrouw Padmé van een zekere dood te redden (hij ziet haar dood – zijn grootste angst – voor zich in zijn dromen). De Faust legende is de basis van vele artistieke, literaire, muzikale en filmische werken door de eeuwen heen.

Chancellor Palpatine: Did you ever hear the tragedy of Darth Plagueis the Wise?
Anakin Skywalker: No.
Chancellor Palpatine: Darth Plagueis was a Dark Lord of the Sith who lived many years ago. He was so powerful and so wise that he could use the Force to influence the midichlorians to create life… He had such a knowledge of the dark side that he could even keep the ones he cared about from dying.
Anakin Skywalker: He could do that? He could actually save people from death?
Chancellor Palpatine: The dark side of the Force is a pathway to many abilities some consider to be unnatural.
Anakin Skywalker: What happened to him?
Chancellor Palpatine: He became so powerful… the only thing he was afraid of was losing his power, which eventually, of course, he did. Unfortunately, he taught his apprentice everything he knew, and then one night, his apprentice killed him in his sleep. It’s ironic that he could save others from death, but not himself.
Anakin Skywalker: Is it possible to learn this power?
Chancellor Palpatine: Not from a Jedi.

7. Het Jezusfiguur
Vaak is de held in fantasiefilms een Messias-achtig figuur zoals Jezus Christus. Denk bijvoorbeeld aan Neo in ‘The Matrix’ of Anakin Skywalker in ‘Star Wars’. Kijk naar het levensverhaal van Anakin Skywalker: een profetie voorspelde zijn komst, hij beschikte over speciale krachten en zijn moeder verwekte hem zonder vader (“there was no father. I can’t explain what happened”). Zijn moeder Shmi Skywalker werd in ‘The Phantom Menace’ dan ook gespeeld door Pernilla August die hetzelfde jaar (1999) verscheen in de tv-film ‘Mary, Mother of Jesus’ in de rol van Mary. De planeet Tatooine waar Anakin ontdekt wordt lijkt veel op Palestina.

Aan het einde van de eerste Star Wars trilogy offert Anakin Skywalker (dan al lange tijd getransformeerd in Darth Vader) zich op om het universum te redden van de kwade Sith. Hij verlost zichzelf dan als het ware van zijn zonden als Darth Vader en daarvoor Anakin (lust, jaloezie en woede). Nu was Jezus zelf zonder zonden volgens de meeste versies van de Bijbel, maar in het veel realistischer verhaal ‘The Last Temptation of Christ’ is dat wel anders.


Neo (Keanu Reeves) is in ‘The Matrix ’een echt Jezusfiguur

8. Symbool voor oneindig
Op 26 oktober 1985 wordt Einstein, de hond van uitvinder Doc Brown, de eerste tijdreiziger in de geschiedenis. Hij doorbreekt het ruimtetijd continuüm wanneer de tijdmachine die Brown gebouwd heeft 88 mijl per uur bereikt. De naam Einstein is toepasselijk aangezien het Albert Einstein’s speciale relativiteitstheorie is die de manipulatie van ruimtetijd mogelijk maakt. Het nummer acht, wanneer op zijn kant gezet, is het symbool voor opsluiting in de tijd, vandaar de 88 mijl per uur die nodig zijn om de ‘Flux Capacitor’ in de tijdmachine te activeren. De ‘Back to the Future’ serie is geïnjecteerd met Egyptische legenden. Die worden uitgebreid besproken in het boek ‘Cinema Symbolism’.

9. Ego, Schaduw, Zelf
Carl Jung was degene die het begrip ‘schaduw’ in de psychologie introduceerde. Hij gaf daaraan een geheel eigen betekenis: het verborgen ware zelf. Dat ware zelf kleeft aan je zoals je schaduw in de stralen van de zon. Als je in het zonlicht staat kun je hoog of laag springen, tegen je schaduw schoppen en wat al niet, maar je raakt die schaduw niet kwijt. Dat geldt precies zo voor je ware zelf. Want je ware zelf, dat ben je, en dat blijft bij je, hoe verborgen ook en hoe je ook je best doet het te verstoppen.

In Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Psycho’ (1960) verkleedt Norman Bates zich als zijn moeder, imiteert hij haar stem, en vermoordt hij jonge vrouwen die ‘moeder’ boos maken met hun flirterige gedrag. Norman is een echte split personality die zowel moeder als zoon is, schaduw en bewust ego. Hitchcock gebruikt de symbolische schaduw persoonlijkheid ook voor het personage Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) in de film. Dit wordt uitgedrukt in de lingerie die ze draagt. Voordat ze geld gestolen heeft, zien we haar in wit ondergoed dat haar onschuld en bewuste ego uitdrukt. Na de diefstal die ze pleegt draagt ze zwarte lingerie dat de schaduwzijde van haar persoonlijkheid symboliseert en haar nieuwe betrokkenheid bij slechte zaken. Net als Bates heeft de persoonlijkheid van Marion Crane twee contrasterende zijden. Bates straft haar door haar, verkleed als zijn moeder, dood te steken in de douche.

10. Wrede moeders
In ‘Alien’ (1979) komt de vrouwelijke held Ripley erachter dat het enige doel van de ruimtemissie waar ze aan deelneemt is om een levend exemplaar van een Xenomorph – een kwaadaardige alien – naar de aarde te brengen. Dat de bemanning daarbij omkomt maakt de opdrachtgever niet uit. De naam van de boordcomputer die de missie coördineert is MOTHER. Het enige andere bemanningslid dat de plannen van MOTHER kent is het kunstmatige wezen Ash, dat de computer compleet volgzaam dient net als Norman Bates zijn moeder dient in ‘Psycho’.

Het idee van een wraakzuchtige en wrede moederfiguur komt uit de mythologie in de vorm van de verdorven godin Nemesis. Andere bekende voorbeelden zijn:
– Joan Crawford (Faye Dunaway) in ‘Mommie Dearest’ (1981)
– Margaret White (Piper Laurie) in ‘Carrie’ (1976)
– Livia Soprano (Nancy Marchand) in ‘The Sopranos’ (1999-2007)
– Mary (Mo’Nique) in ‘Precious’ (2009)
– Ma Jarrett (Margaret Wycherly) in ‘White Heat’ (1949)
– Janine ‘Smurf’ Cody (Jacki Weaver) in ‘Animal Kingdom’ (2010)
– En ook al is ze dood in de film, Norma Bates in ‘Psycho’ (1960)


De ‘Queen Mother’ in ‘Aliens’: de wrede moeder in ware monsterlijke vorm…

In het volgende en laatste deel van de serie – ‘de mindset’ – bespreken we wat er komt kijken bij het mentale proces van scenarioschrijven.

The Story of Film: Time Traveling For the Cinemad

By Jeppe Kleyngeld

It had to be done someday; making a literal odyssey through the history of cinema and documenting it into a film. The traveller is Mark Cousins. The film is a 15 hour documentary called ‘The Story of Film’. Through cinematic innovation, the story of film is told, from the silent era to the multimillion dollar digital age, covering all continents, major cinematic hallmarks and most talented people in cinema.

The Story of Film 1

The beginning
In 1885 George Eastman of Kodak came up with the idea of film on a role. Then Edison figured that if you spin the images in a box you get the illusion of movement. Lumiere went on to invent the film projector and with that: Cinema! It is not difficult to imagine the excitement of those first screenings. When cinemas started appearing everywhere, it enabled people – who did not travel back then – to see other countries. Not just places, but other worlds. Like what the position of woman was in other countries.

After the invention came the content. And despite of what many believe, it is not the money men that drive cinema. They can’t. Because what you need is the visual ideas, and a clear understanding of what is in people’s hearts. It is psychology that became the driving force of film if anything.

Cousins continues to show us the birth of basic cinema language and techniques that are now common, such as editing, the close up, tracking shots and flashbacks. The road trip then takes us further to the places and the people that brought life to this sublime art form.

1910s
In this period a lot was happening in Scandinavia. Maybe it was the Northern Light, Cousins comments. Or the sense of destiny and mortality in Scandinavian literature that made Danish and Swedish movies more graceful and honest. In 1906 the first feature film was shot in Australia: ‘The Story of the Kelly Gang’. The first feature film in Hollywood was ‘The Squaw Man’ (1914). In 1911 the first movie studio was build. Another interesting thing about this period was that a lot of women were working in Hollywood writing and directing, such as Lois Weber and Alice Guy. They did not always get the credits though.

1920s
In Hollywood, cinema became big business in this period (and a men’s world as well). The 1920s saw the birth of an industry in Hollywood. But the studio system did not get in the film, according to Stanley Donen (director ‘Singing in the Rain’). There were also rebels that emerged – like Orson Welles – that tried to break the bubble. In Europe, cinema developed also. Thematically, the city was often the Big Evil. Think for example ‘Metropolis’ and ‘Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans’. In Japan it was as if the Japanese filmmakers tried to compensate for the massacres their country caused by making very humanistic films. In 1921, the first great Japanese movie was made: ‘Souls on the Road’.

1930s
A lot of innovations were introduced in the 1930s like sound and the use of two camera’s with overhead lighting. From Hollywood came horror movies like ‘Frankenstein’ which borrowed heavily from Germany (Der Golem). And the first gangster pictures appeared, which is an original American genre. The cartoon also arrived and was a very successful new genre. Mickey Mouse was a smash hit and in 1937 came the even more successful ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’. In Britain, the legendary Alfred Hitchcock started working. He understood the basic human emotion ‘fear’ like no other, and his films are still extremely influential to this day.

1940s
The war years meant less glory, and more gloomy films. In Italy we witnessed the birth of neo realism. The sensational ‘The Bicycle Thieves’ (1939) is a movie that best illustrates this style. In 1941 came ‘Citizen Kane’ – a film that is still often considered by many as one of the greatest movies of all time. It used deep staging so audiences could choose where to look. This was previously used in films like ‘Gone With the Wind’ (1939) and ‘Stagecoach’ (1939), which Welles said to have seen 39 times. A dark genre arrived in Hollywood, called Film Noir. These films, such as ‘Double Indemnity’ usually had characters with flaws that drove them towards their faith, even while they tried to avoid it. The decade ended as depressing as it began with a massive communist hunt in Hollywood: the studios had to fire the (alleged) lefties. This is still a major trauma in Hollywood.

1950s
In America in the fifties, we had the suburban, Christian society. But under the surface there was anger, frustration and tension. Classic films like ‘On the Waterfront’ (1954) and ‘Rebel Without a Cause’ (1955) best illustrate this. In Europe four legendary directors led the way in changing cinema. They were Jacques Tati, Robert Bresson, Ingmar Bergman and Federico Fellini, and they made films more personal and self aware than they had ever been. The era ended with the new wave to which French director Jean-Luc Godard belonged and in Italy Pier Paolo Pasolini. The later used religious music for everyday struggles. He felt consumerism was taking over.

The Story of Film 2

1960s
Sergio Leone made his first ‘spaghetti western’ (Italian made Western) and introduced deep focus, which was made possible by the Italian cinematic invention technoscope in 1960. This gives Leone’s movies an epic feel to them. Thematically, Leone was inspired by Japanese Master Akira Kurosawa (lone gunman / lone samurai). Filmmaking went global in the sixties. In Eastern Europe, directors like Roman Polanski and Milos Forman started their careers. In the Soviet Union, one of the greatest directors ever started working: Andrei Tarkovsky, who knew how to create remarkable imagery. According to Tarkovsky: ‘Imagery contains an awareness of the infinite.’ Late sixties, film schools were popping up all around the USA and a new generation was on its way.

1970s
After the realism in movies in the sixties, the seventies saw a return of old fashioned, romantic and entertaining cinema – and of the box office smash hits, think ‘Star Wars’, ‘The Exorcist’ and ‘Jaws’. ‘The Godfather’ was the return of an old Hollywood genre: the gangster film. New kids were fighting to open up new form, most notably Martin Scorsese with ‘Taxi Driver’ and ‘Mean Streets’. When people think of the seventies, they think about Spielberg, Lucas, Coppola and Scorsese. But there was more. In i.a. Britain and Italy, identity was a major theme. In Germany, Rainer Werner Fassbinder (woman in closed places) and Wim Wenders (men in open spaces) had their glory years. And Werner Herzog the explorer went across the world. He was not so much interested in the feminism or Americana of his contemporaries, but in prime evil life. After John Ford, he is the most important landscape filmer in the history of film. The 70’s also saw the arrival of Asian mainstream, epic films from India (‘Sholay’) and a lot of cinematic activity in Africa.

1980s
After the magnificent seventies came the not-so-great eighties. ‘Protest’ is the central theme of this decade. The 5th generation in China – Chen Kaige and Zhang Yimou – made interesting movies. From Russia came one of the greatest war movies: ‘Come and See’. In America, ‘Top Gun’ was a smash hit, and many movies were influenced by music video’s, like ‘Flashdance’. In France, filmmakers got more into popular culture, which was a protest in itself. Notable directors that moved up in the film world were David Lynch (with ‘Blue Velvet’) and David Cronenberg in Canada with ‘Videodrome’, a prophetic vision of the modern world in which the real and the televisual are dangerously confused.

1990s
Described by Cousins as the last days of celluloid, before the coming of digital. And directors like Wong Kar Wai and Hou Hsiao-hsien used celluloid devotedly. The 90s saw passionate films about other worlds (‘The Matrix’), but also an obsession about reality, for example in the work of Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami who tried to eliminate all dolly’s and clapperboards from the set. From Japan came horror movies about the fear for technology, like ‘Tetsuo’ about a man blending with metal. In Copenhagen, filmmakers returned to primitive filmmaking with Dogma, while Hollywood saw the increasing use of digital effects (‘Terminator 2’ / ‘Gladiator’ / ‘Jurassic Park’). Not only what was in the camera changed, what happened in front of the camera changed as well. Modern became post-modern: The idea that there are no new truths and everything is recycled. Tarantino made this his trade, but respected established directors, like Scorsese, used it as well.

2000s
Documentaries – like ‘Fahrenheit 9/11’ – did as well as blockbusters and blockbusters tried to be like documentaries. Innovative movies were made in the USA. Like ‘Requiem For a Dream’: The great distortion movie. The subconscious got at work in ‘Mulholland Drive’. And in Thailand: ‘Tropical Malady’, a film that changes from simplistic tale of friendship to the mythical story of the hunter and the hunted. The film reincarnates like its main character. Another innovative example is ‘Russian Ark’, which consists of one 90 minute long take showing Aristocrats walking downstairs in a massive palace towards the slaughter.

And the future of cinema? Who knows. Perhaps one day we can share dreams like in ‘Inception’. One thing is for sure: Whatever form it may take, the art of cinema is here to stay and deserves to be celebrated likes this.

Icon 29 - Movie Camera

 

- Aanbevolen Divider

Top 10 intro (credit sequences) van TV-series

https://jkleyngeld.wordpress.com/2011/09/07/

5 elementen van een krachtig verhaal

10 management lessons from highly successful gangsters

5 Reasons ‘Scarface’ Rarely Makes it to Critics’ Favorite Lists

Mijn Top 20 favoriete filmmakers

1. Martin Scorsese
Verantwoordelijk voor mijn favoriete film aller tijden: GoodFellas. Maar maakte talloze andere meesterwerken; Raging Bull, Taxi Driver, Casino, en vele anderen. Scorsese is een echte maestro die nooit teleur stelt.
Beste film: GoodFellas

2. Sergio Leone
Leefde te kort om een enorm portfolio na te laten, maar alles wat hij gedaan heeft is te gek. The Dollars Trilogy met Eastwood zijn de coolste films ooit en Once Upon a Time in America is een geniaal gangster epos.
Beste film: Once Upon a Time in the West

3. Quentin Tarantino
Maakt originele & uber coole films die hij baseert op onbekende pareltjes. Zijn meesterwerk is nog altijd Pulp Fiction, maar Reservoir Dogs en Kill Bill zijn bijna net zo briljant. Maakt nooit iets ondermaats.
Beste film: Pulp Fiction

4. Peter Jackson
Wist de onmogelijke missie om The Lord of the Rings te verfilmen tot een onvoorstelbaar succes te maken. Was daarvoor al een geweldig regisseur die Nieuw-Zeelandse splatter horror films maakte zoals Bad Taste en Braindead.
Beste film: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

5.
The Coen Brothers
Hun oog voor bizarre personages is hyper ontwikkeld, hun humor onovertroffen en hun pen vlijmscherp. Ze maken om de twee jaar een te gekke film al zo’n 25 jaar lang, met hun hoogtepunt in de jaren 90 toen ze achtereenvolgens Fargo, The Big Lebowski en O Brother, Where Art Thou? maakte.
Beste film: Miller’s Crossing

6. Stanley Kubrick
De perfectionist. Leverde meesterwerken af die voor altijd verankerd zijn in de filmgeschiedenis. Wist uit te blinken in verschillende genres waaronder sci-fi (2001: A Space Odyssey), oorlog (Full Metal Jacket) en misdaad (The Killing)
Beste film: A Clockwork Orange

7. Steven Spielberg
Objectief de beste regisseur ter wereld. Weet de magie van film te pakken als geen ander. Heeft talloze klassiekers op zijn staan waaronder E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Schindler’s List en Jurassic Park.
Beste film: Raiders of the Lost Ark

8.
Alfred Hitchcock
Hitchcock weet van een kartonnen doos nog tot een super spannend voorwerp te maken. Ze noemen hem niet voor niets de Master of Suspense. Is waarschijnlijk de meest invloedrijke regisseur ooit. Talloze scènes uit zijn oeuvre staan voor altijd op mijn netvlies gebrand.
Beste film: Rear Window

9. Sam Raimi
Maakte de hoogst vermakelijke Spider Man films, maar waar hij zichzelf wat mij betreft mee onsterfelijk heeft gemaakt is de Evil Dead trilogie. Heerlijke films. Maakte met The Quick and the Dead ook een fantastische western.
Beste film: Evil Dead II

10. Francis Ford Coppola
Hey, hij regisseerde The Godfather trilogie, hoe ga ik hem niet in mijn Top 10 zetten? Was ook verantwoordelijk voor de beste oorlogsfilm aller tijden met Apocalyse Now. Fenomenaal.
Beste film: The Godfather

Daarna volgen:
11. George Lucas (Beste Film: Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope)
12. James Cameron (Beste Film: Terminator 2: Judgment Day)
13. Danny Boyle (Beste Film: Trainspotting)
14. Brian De Palma (Beste Film: The Untouchables)
15. Akira Kurosawa (Beste Film: Throne of Blood)
16. Paul Verhoeven (Beste Film: RoboCop)
17. Robert Zemeckis (Beste Film: Back to the Future Part II)
18. Richard Linklater (Beste Film: Dazed and Confused)
19. Robert Rodriquez (Beste Film: Sin City)
20. Jim Jarmusch (Beste Film: Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai)